Apr 1, 2013

Find out what will be cuts and how it may affect you



Find out what will be the cuts and how it may affect you, 

Thursday, May 2nd, Coast Plaza Hotel, Calgary, Alberta
1316-33 Street NE 9:30 to 10:30 am

(Download poster) Interpreters will be at the event

PDD plans to cut 42.5 million to services.  The Disability Action Hall has set up a meeting with the Minister to help us understand what is happening.
We are setting up a meeting directly with the Minister to ask what services are being cut and tell the minister what services are important to you. We will also be joined by the Assistant Deputy Minister Brenda Lee Doyle.
We are inviting people with disabilities to ask questions about how the cuts will affect us. People can also bring your caregiver, parents and friends. We will have seating for 300 people. Seating is first come, first serve. Call Denise Young at 403.717.5613 for more information. 
To learn more about why Associate Minister Frank Oberle does not think the Community Access Program was working, here is what the Minister said to the Edmonton Journal on Friday, March 31st, 2013 read this Edmonton Journal Article
Minister Frank Oberle, Associate Minister of Person with Developmental Disabilities will be at the Coast Plaza, Thursday May 2, 2013 to answer your questions and hear your stories.
 

2 comments:

  1. LETTER TO THE EDITOR
    Community Access (aka Citizenship) is Working – A Response to Minister Oberle
    April 2nd, 2013 Calgary, AB,

    Every Albertan has a life in our community; from shoveling our walks to grocery shopping to going to our doctor to volunteering in a non-profit organization to cooking in a community kitchen to having a “Tims”. Most of us are able to experience the great opportunities that Alberta has to offer fairly independently. Some people, including many with developmental disabilities, need some support to do this. Thus the PDD Community Access program was born many years ago.

    The Community Access program demonstrates that our society has come a long way from hiding and isolating the Disability community to including and involving it. The Disabled community has come a long way from being ashamed to feeling proud. People with Disabilities are our friends, our neighbors, our co-workers, our teammates, our customers, our brothers and sisters and our children. Some of them are our clients – because they require some assistance – to be full citizens in a province of opportunity and plenty.
    Minister OBerle has suggested that the Community Access program is not effective and needs to be replaced with employment. It is hard not to argue that employment should be a primary focus for folks and in fact it is the goal of many disabled people and their supports. There is a strong employment focus in our services and many people with developmental disabilities work. However it is also true that many folks have a variety of barriers that make competitive employment challenging. Here in lies the dilemma. If people with developmental disabilities have been unsuccessful in finding or maintaining employment with assistance but can contribute and participate in community life in other ways then should they be supported to do so?

    I think (and hope) that the answer is YES. Without a strong Community Access program a marginalized community that has struggled for decades to belong will slip back into hiding. Without assistance people will not be able to volunteer, make their medical appointments, see friends and family, and contribute to our national pastime (Tim’s). Without a strong program costs to other systems such as health and justice may increase. Isolation and loneliness is not the answer. Citizenship and inclusion is. Let’s keep this program alive and effective through ongoing financial supports and meaningful dialogue between the many stakeholders committed to excellent services.

    Sincerely,
    Ryan Geake

    ReplyDelete
  2. Family Forum on Disability Supports and Services:
    An opportunity for families to learn more about the
    Alberta budget and its implications for children and adults with disabilities

    Monday, April 15, 2013
    9:30 - 11:30 am (MST)

    In-Person Option
    NOW FULL.
    Those interested are still able to attend via live webcast.
    See instructions and details below.

    Webcast Option
    Watch this live webcast using your Smartphone,
    iPhone, iPad, laptop or computer using
    high speed internet from home, work or the road!

    Please read prior to registering:

    A confirmation e-mail with all event details will automatically be sent to the e-mail address you provide below. If you do not receive a confirmation within twenty minutes of registering, please call Aimee Caster at 780-944-8636.
    In-Person Attendance

    The event will be located on the main floor of the hotel in the "Palm" Room. Coffee, tea, water will be provided.
    The hotel has free, underground parking. A parking code is provided, along with instructions on where you can and cannot park in the "Confirmation" e-mail.
    Webcast Viewing

    You can view this lecture from the your office, home or the road vis live webcast using your Smartphone, iPhone, iPad, laptop or computer. We strongly advise you test your system in advance.
    Please click here to test your system. You may need to contact your internet provider (or IT Department if viewing from your place of work) if you have difficulties.
    The laptop/computer address of the webcast is: http://www.research4children.com/admin/contentx/default.cfm?PageId=10000847. If attending via Smartphone, iPhone or iPad, please see the directions for connecting in your "Confirmation" e-mail.
    If you plan to view this event from your place of work, please provide your IT department with a minimum of one week's notice to give you the permissions that may be necessary to view live, streaming video.
    If you have any questions, please call Aimee Caster at 780-944-8636 or e-mail acaster@research4children.com.

    ReplyDelete

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